Big K.R.I.T. speaks on his battle with alcoholism

If somebody is 20 and they don’t get what I’m talking about, if I did it right then when they’re 30 or 40 maybe they’ll understand what I’m talking about – that’s timeless music” – Big K.R.I.T. on what he wants to accomplish with his music

‘The Price of Fame’ isn’t just the eighth track on disc 2 of Big K.R.I.T.’s 4eva Is a Mighty Long Time – it’s a valuable lesson the man born Justin Scott learned the hard way. This ultimately was for the betterment of his career and life.

Last month, the King Remembered In Time stopped by Sway and was asked about the progress of his sobriety. Admitting the road to getting clean has been challenging at times, he reveals that this isn’t something one can just stop on a whim; it takes time.

“It’s just about slowing down and it’s a battle, I tell people that,” said Big K.R.I.T. “I still deal with that and on occasion, I slip. I’m working through it but the lifestyle I’m actually in, it’s everywhere and easily accessible so I have to work very hard at it.”

The Mississippi native mentions the addiction occurred slowly over time, due in part to his career and his inability to be taken seriously as a human because of the success he’s attained.

“I started to realize how much comes with the attention…because when you tell somebody like ‘man, I ain’t really feeling good man, things ain’t really right’ they be like ‘man, what you mean bro? You home man, you doing it big man, you got this, you got that’ and it keeps you from really expressing what you’re going through,” he said.

“That’s a natural process, to need to talk about how you feel and you should never feel guilty no matter what financial status you’re at. Depression is depression and money doesn’t make people happy and that’s what I realize.”



Because he didn’t have that outlet in the form of anyone who would understand where he was coming from, it lead to him developing trust issues and eventually searching for the bottle to help him cope with his woes.

“It’s like I had acquired all this stuff and I put myself in all these rooms with all these people, but I was so alone,” said K.R.I.T.

“Even calling people [would put] me in the position where I didn’t know if I could trust the information that I’m telling them. [I didn’t know] if I could be like ‘yo man, I think I’m having an anxiety attack,’ you don’t know who to call because you like ‘man, is this person gon’ tell somebody? Is this gon’ end up on a record?’ You start spiralling and whatever vice you got, you start using it more and more and more to cover up what you dealing with…paranoia is real.”

During the full interview, which can be viewed below, K.R.I.T. discusses a bevy of topics including going further into detail about how bad his alcoholism became, why his sound is so unique when compared to what’s being played on the radio today, why he’s grateful for meeting Bun B (and other southern rap luminaries) and more.  He also kicks a dope freestyle at the end so stick around until the end if you watch it.